Celeste Inspires | Yoga Studio In Downtown Toronto ON

     

Sticking with Exercise; How to do Repeats

When I was 13 years old, my swimming instructor asked me if I was coming to the final exam.  I thought that was a pretty weird question because she knew I had been swimming lengths everyday to prepare.    “What do you mean, am I coming?” “Because you’re not going to pass”, she answered. “Why?” I said, truly wanted to understand.  “Because you don’t have the strength”, came the answer.

I looked at her, finished my lengths, got out of the pool and went to the weight room.  I snuck in actually. You had to be 14 to get into the weight room so I deeked behind one of the guys and got buzzed in.  I started pumping iron and loved it. I came back the next day and the next. I kept sneaking in with guys that got buzzed in and asked questions when I wasn’t sure what to do to strengthen some particular body part.  I lifted weights for the 3 weeks before the swimming exam.

I failed the exam. My teacher was right, I didn’t have the strength.  I had to wait 3 months before they would allow me to take the test again.  During those three months, I lifted weights 5 days a week. I got every muscle mag I could get my hands on at the library and studied the pros routines.  Soon, I was sculpting my delts and knew how to expand my lats.

I took the swimming exam again.

I passed.  My strength had improved so drastically during those three months that it felt as if years had passed since the last test.  I had changed. I was experiencing a new prowess in my body that could only be described as having more muscle circuitry at my command.  I felt like I knew how to move my body with an intrinsic power and inner directedness. Each step I took felt like I had new legs, as if every fibre was firing. It felt like my whole body was on my team.  And cheering.

Soon, I became a regular, and was one of the guys.  I scheduled my whole day and week around my workout.   It was as if I had found the place I wanted to be in my life and was inspired to invest as much time as I could there and learn everything I could about the business.  I wanted to explore every possible way to contribute to this amazing strength that was my body. I never missed a workout, it never occurred to me. I only wanted to see what this body was capable of during each daily investment.  

The desire to improve came from this intrigue.  There was no ego or drive to improve or get stronger, it was to become more of who I already was.  There was no image or notion of how my body ought to be. I simply wanted to keep working out and see what happened.  It’s like dancing your face off because it feels liberating and amazing and you find out you won the dance contest. You couldn’t care less. You’re just happy you got to dance.  In fact they probably had to interrupt your dance to let you know you won.

Exercising in this way connected me to my body.  And in doing so, to myself and others. Soon my body became this amazing vehicle to sculpt, strengthen and explore.  I wanted to learn about every muscle group, what it did, how to strengthen it and stretch it for maximum tone and shape and overall performance.  One day, when I was on the exercise bike with a pool of sweat collecting on the floor, a guy approached me, shaking his head and asked, “what are you training for?”  I drew a blank. Then it hit me, “Life”, I said. He shook his head with a smile and gave me a quizzical lift of the eye brows. And in that moment I knew it was true.  I was training for life. Not for me, not for an end result, not for aesthetic purposes or even physical development. I was training for life. I was training to live the fullest life I could live without feeling blocked by perceived limitations.  I found that when I busted a physical weakness and reached a greater strength, I felt bigger, vaster and more of who I really am. Soon, this revealed that perceived limitations were simply indications of areas to strengthen and explore. This became a driving principle in my life.  I cut out a quote from Robert Louis Stephenson and put it in my training journal, “To be what we are and to become what we are capable of becoming, is the only end of life.”

My training was a meditation.  It was a time to enter a gateway to an inner sanctuary where I was the master. It was a chance for my body and mind to experience a contextual field where they could really expand, express and evolve.  Each workout was a chance to experience a physical edge, to extend previous limitations and find new capacities. It was anything but discipline. It felt like finding something that belongs to you, that you had been missing all along and didn’t even know you had.  It’s the ultimate inheritance.

By the time I was eighteen, I was lifting weights, running, and swimming 6 days a week. Working out was like eating, it was inspired fuel. It was a real kick too.  It was the one place in my life where I felt I didn’t need to answer to anyone, meet a deadline or subscribe to an expectation. It was the ultimate relationship in permission.  I felt a certainty in that realm of my life that comes from self-investment.

That year, I walked into the physed dept. of the college I was attending and asked to see the director.  When he came to the desk, I told him I was going to teach the women’s weight training course that his department offered in the evenings.  He smiled and said, “Then I guess you better step into my office.” This was a rather interesting statement as there was a very qualified Russian instructor teaching the course. This meant nothing to me. I could only feel the desire to share what I was learning about the body with other women. The director asked me to have a seat in his tiny office.  I declined, telling him I was too excited to sit. He smiled. I told him all about my experience and that I had to teach the course. I was hired on the spot.

My enthusiasm to teach about the body came from a spilling over at the seams to share with other souls the incredible (yet, so natural) vitality and streaming energy that comes from enlivening the cells, otherwise referred to as exercise.  I knew that committing to care for your body means you care for your life. It means you believe in yourself and will continue to believe in yourself. And this means you can rely on yourself. When you workout, or walk or play tennis, and then do it again tomorrow and again next week even though you’re achy and bloated, you learn something: that you can rely on yourself.  And when you can rely on yourself, an inner congruency is enhanced between the body and mind. Soon, your mind starts firing you inspirational numbers that you want to follow through with. Like great ideas for just about anything that’s plaguing you, even breakthrough solutions for relationship glitches.  Basically, anything can get unstuck when you start to move your body. Neitche said, “Never trust a thought that did not occur whilst moving around in the great outdoors.”  That’s our cue.

Exercising daily has shown me that I can rely on myself.  It has assisted me with the stamina to raise a child on my own from birth, to run my own fitness business and studio and to attract healthy relationships in my professional life and with (lovely) men.  Basically, it has helped me stay sane and happy when I ought to have been exhausted, depleted, below the poverty line and not particularly excited about men. I can honestly say that exercising daily has been my salvation, my gateway to emotional purging, my sense of humor savior, my sanctuary, my connection to nature and therefore myself and my trip out of back pain, chronic fatigue (three years), fibromyalgia, scoliosis and becoming a serial single mother.

Please join me.

When I was 13 years old, my swimming instructor asked me if I was coming to the final exam.  I thought that was a pretty weird question because she knew I had been swimming lengths everyday to prepare.    “What do you mean, am I coming?” “Because you’re not going to pass”, she answered. “Why?” I truly wanted to understand.  “Because you don’t have the strength”, came the answer.

I looked at her, finished my lengths, got out of the pool and went to the weight room.  I snuck in actually. You had to be 14 to get into the weight room so I hid behind one of the guys and got buzzed in.  I started pumping iron and loved it. I came back the next day and the next. I kept sneaking in with the guys that got buzzed through the door. I asked questions when I wasn’t sure what to do to strengthen some particular body part.  I lifted weights for the 3 weeks before the swimming exam.

 

I failed the exam. My teacher was right, I didn’t have the strength.  I had to wait 3 months before they would allow me to take the test again.  During those three months, I lifted weights 5 days a week. I got every muscle mag I could get my hands on at the library and studied the pros’routines.  Soon, I was sculpting my delts and knew how to expand my lats.

 

I took the swimming exam again.

I passed.  My strength had improved so drastically during those three months that it felt as if years had passed since the last test.  I had changed. I was experiencing a new prowess in my body that could only be described as having more muscle circuitry at my command.  I now knew how to move my body with an intrinsic power and inner directedness. Each step I took felt like I had new legs, as if every fibre was firing. It felt like my whole body was on my team.  And cheering.

 

Soon, I became a regular, and one of the guys.  The token girl (it was 1978!) I scheduled my whole day and week around my workouts.   It was as if I had found the place I wanted to be in my life and was inspired to learn everything I could about the business of body adaptability.  I wanted to explore every possible way to contribute to this amazing strength that was my body. I never missed a workout, it never occurred to me. I only wanted to see what this body was capable of during each daily investment.  

 

The desire to improve came from this intrigue.  There was no ego or drive to improve or get stronger, it was to become more of who I already was.  There was no image or notion of how my body ought to be. I simply wanted to keep working out and see what happened.  It’s like dancing your face off because it feels liberating and amazing and you find out you won the dance contest. You couldn’t care less. You’re just happy you got to dance.  In fact they probably had to interrupt your dance to let you know you won.

Exercising in this way connected me to my body.  And in doing so, to myself and others.

 

Soon my body became this amazing vehicle to sculpt, strengthen and explore.  I wanted to learn about every muscle group, what it did, how to strengthen it and stretch it for maximum tone and shape.  One day, when I was on the exercise bike with a pool of sweat the size of Lake Huron collecting around me, a guy approached me, shaking his head and asked, “What are you training for?”  I drew a blank. Then it hit me, “Life”, I said. He shook his head with a smile and gave me a quizzical lift of the eyebrows. And in that moment I knew it was true.  I was training for life. Not for me, not for an end result, not for aesthetic purposes or even physical development. I was training for life. I was training to live the fullest life I could live without feeling blocked by perceived limitations.  I found that when I busted a physical weakness and reached a greater strength, I felt bigger, vaster and more of who I really am. Soon, this revealed that perceived limitations were simply indications of areas to strengthen and explore. This became a driving principle in my life.  I cut out a quote from Robert Louis Stephenson and put it in my training journal, “To be what we are and to become what we are capable of becoming, is the only end of life.”

 

My training was a meditation.  It was a time to enter a gateway to an inner sanctuary where I was the master. It was a chance for my body and mind to experience a contextual field where they could really expand, express and evolve.  Each workout was a chance to experience a physical edge, to extend previous limitations and find new capacities. It was anything but discipline. It felt like finding something that belongs to you, that you had been missing all along and didn’t even know you had.  It’s the ultimate inheritance.

By the time I was eighteen, I was lifting weights, running, and swimming 6 days a week. Working out was like eating, it was inspired fuel. It was a real kick too.  It was the one place in my life where I felt I didn’t need to answer to anyone, meet a deadline or subscribe to an expectation. It was the ultimate relationship in permission.  I felt a certainty in that realm of my life that comes from self-investment.

 

That year, I walked into the physed dept. of the college I was attending and asked to see the director.  When he came to the desk, I told him I was going to teach the women’s weight training course that his department offered in the evenings.  He smiled and said, “Then I guess you better step into my office.” This was a rather interesting statement as there was a very qualified Russian instructor teaching the course. This meant nothing to me. I could only feel the desire to share what I was learning about the body with other women. The director asked me to have a seat in his tiny office.  I declined, telling him I was too excited to sit. He smiled. I told him all about my experience and that I had to teach the course. I was hired on the spot.

 

My enthusiasm to teach about the body came from a spilling over at the seams to share with other souls the incredible (yet, so natural) vitality and streaming energy that comes from enlivening the cells, otherwise referred to as exercise.  I knew that committing to care for your body means you care for your life. It means you believe in yourself and will continue to believe in yourself. And this means you can rely on yourself. When you workout, or walk or play tennis, and then do it again tomorrow and again next week even though you’re achy and bloated, you learn something: you can rely on yourself.  And when you can rely on yourself, an inner congruency is enhanced between the body and mind. Soon, your mind starts firing you inspirational numbers that you want to follow through with. Like great ideas for just about anything that’s plaguing you, even breakthrough solutions for relationship glitches.  Basically, anything can get unstuck when you start to move your body. Neitche said, “Never trust a thought that did not occur whilst moving around in the great outdoors.”  That’s our cue.

 

Exercising daily has shown me that I can rely on myself.  It has assisted me with the stamina to raise a child on my own from birth, to run my own fitness business and studio and to attract healthy relationships in my professional life and with (lovely) men.  Basically, it has helped me stay sane and happy when I ought to have been exhausted, depleted, below the poverty line and not particularly excited about men. I can honestly say that exercising daily has been my salvation, my gateway to emotional purging, my sense of humour saviour, my sanctuary, my connection to nature and therefore myself and my trip out of back pain, chronic fatigue (three years), fibromyalgia, scoliosis and becoming a serial single mother.

 

Please join me.

Exercise.

 

Exercise when you feel nasty and you can prove the whole world started it first. Exercise when you need to get the laundry done and you can’t find a clean sock (or underwear—go commando at the gym) And, absolutely know that your child will not rot in someone else’s care while you take time for yourself.  It is time to put our bodies first. If you do, if you are willing to join me and say yes to exercise, you will have truckloads of energy for the laundry and for your darling daughter when you get home.

Exercise.

Exercise when you feel nasty and you can prove the whole world started it first. Exercise when you need to get the laundry done and you can’t find a clean sock (or underwear—go commando at the gym) And absolutely know that your child will not rot in someone else’s care while you take time for yourself.  It is time to put our bodies first. If you do, if you are willing to join me and say yes to exercise, you will have truckloads of energy for the laundry and for your darling daughter when you get home.